Sharing The Peapod's Travel Adventures...

Royal Botanic Gardens of Cranbourne & The Australian Garden

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This entry was posted on 6/5/2007 5:00 AM and is filed under Australia.

A fantastic day trip to Cranbourne, about an hour outside of Melbourne, took us, along with our pal Lucinda, to the beautiful Botanic Gardens and the site of "The Australian Garden".  The day we visited they were celebrating their one year anniversary of having this specific garden site open.

The Australian Garden was designed by Taylor Cullity Lethlean with Paul Thompson.  It is a magnificent showcase for the diversity of Australian plants.  In the center is the Red Sand Garden with vibrant red sand with circles of gray-blue Saltbush and crescent-shaped lunettes.  This area represents the arid parts of Australia.

On the sides are five Exhibition gardens that were open to competition.  They plan to hold another competition in 5 years to replace the current showpiece gardens (The Future Garden, The Home Garden, The Children's Garden, The Water Saving Garden, and The Diversity Garden)

There's a beautiful Rockpool Waterway and Escarpment Wall that is more like a sculpture inspired by red sandstone escarpments in Uluru and King's Canyon.

Here are some photos from this remarkable garden...



When you enter these sculpted gardens, it looks like a giant mandala filling a huge space with sectioned patterns of various gardens...



These sections were separated by thick white lacquered rope.  The purple "mulch" was really made up of mussell shells...



This section was one of the award winning beds chosen to represent water conservation...



This futuristic bed provided seating as well as laser sticks that kept animals out at night and lent an artistic mystery to it...



Here's part of the beautiful water feature that traveled for a great length of the garden...


Here's the award winning "Home Garden", representing the garden look of the 60's...



And the children's garden had this fun wish bone walk through...



Along with these magical chalkboards...



These majestic giant grass trees, formerly called "Black Boys" are over 400 years old.  Fire triggers their flower growth.  The mature flower spikes were used by Aboriginal Australians to make spears and firesticks, which were used to make fire...




 

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